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Law LLB at NCH London

The LLB is a Qualifying Law Degree, covering all of the Law Society and Bar Council required areas of study to permit progression onto the professional training courses for qualification as a Solicitor or Barrister. In the first and second years students learn how laws are formed and how the legal system is structured, together with studying areas such as the law that regulates government, contracts, crime, ownership of land, and the law of the European Union.

The third year includes the option to undertake a dissertation, which is a supervised, self-directed study on a subject of each student’s choosing.

* For your Law LLB you will study the University of London degree syllabus. You will be assessed by examination, and your examinations will be set and marked by the University of London. For your NCH Diploma you will be assessed by a combination of assignments and examinations. On successful completion of the undergraduate programme, you will be awarded a University of London Law LLB and the NCH Diploma.
*Please note that NCH cannot currently sponsor international students for a Tier 4 visa to study the single honours Law Degree LLB.
To reflect the greater richness of your studies at the College, you will be awarded the New College of the Humanities Diploma in addition to your University of London degree. The Diploma sets you apart from other graduates. It marks the greater breadth of your education at the College.

 


In your first year

This comprehensive introduction to the English legal system seeks to convey what is distinctive about the common law approach as a legal methodology and as it reflects the history and politics of England and Wales. It examines the sources of law, the civil and criminal court structures and the role of judges and the jury. A running concern of the course is the question of fairness: the impact of the Human Rights Act on the criminal justice system and the issues of access to justice in the civil courts. This course is also vital in initiating you into the process of legal research and the final examination has a compulsory section on research activities carried out during the year. This course is studied in full in the Michaelmas term.

Contracts are the legal basis of all commercial transactions. This course covers core topics – including formation of contracts, capacity to contract and privity, performance and breach of contract and remedies for breach of contract. The emphasis is on understanding the key underlying principles of English law. This is very much a case law subject, with judicial precedents stretching back nearly 400 years in some instances (but more usually of nineteenth and twentieth-century origin) and a small number of statutory provisions, as well as the impact of EU law. An understanding of what factors judges may, or must, take into account when exercising their discretion is crucial. This course is studied across both Michaelmas and Hilary terms at ‘half pace’.

This course examines general principles of criminal liability, a range of fatal and non-fatal offences against the person and selected offences against property. Attempts to commit offences, secondary liability and defences also form part of the University of London criminal law curriculum. Criminal law consists of a highly developed body of precisely formulated legal rules, but, as criminal conduct is subject to punishment, it thus engages with broad issues of morality and policy. Understanding the tension between certainty in the law and social adaptation affecting the development of criminal law will take you beyond the basic stage of understanding the substantive rules of criminal law. This course is studied in full in the Hilary term.

The UK constitution is famously ‘unwritten’ and thus contrasts with other constitutional models. Analysing key issues of sovereignty and the division of powers between legislature, executive and administration, one key question is how far the UK lives up to classic doctrine. Equally, membership of the European Union, and the Human Rights Act 1998, affect the overall picture of the relation between citizen and the state. To fully engage with this subject, you need to take an interest in current affairs and debates about what is involved in constitutional issues and reforms. This course is studied across both Michaelmas and Hilary terms at ‘half pace’.

This course introduces students to first-order logical notation and enables them to translate natural language arguments into formal patterns and assess them for argumentative virtues such as validity, soundness, and relevance. It also introduces students to common fallacies of reasoning and develops their abilities to articulate their ideas clearly and persuasively.

Professor AC Grayling teaches this course. It runs in Michaelmas term of the first year. Assessment is by end-of-term exam.

This course introduces students to methodologies of the natural and social sciences, covering topics such as evidence, induction, and interpretation. Representative questions include: What are the relations between theory and observation? Can we rely on the past? Does anything survive scientific revolutions?

The Philosophy Faculty teaches this course in Hilary term of the first year. Assessment is by end-of-term exam.

The Professional Programme provides students with an understanding of the world of work, including financial literacy, business and employment. This programme helps develop the attitudes and behaviours that are required by employers, is extremely practical, and is a complement to the academic offering pursued by the College’s undergraduates.

The first course runs through students’ first year and gives participants a basic groundwork in the core skills that are needed in the workplace, including writing, presenting, working in teams, marketing, and research.

At the end of the year students are able to communicate fluently and persuasively and write succinctly and clearly.  These skills are supplemented by seminars on marketing and market research providing students with a focus on the customer.  These capabilities are further developed and tested in a project that runs at the end of the Trinity term.

The programme is delivered by Matthew Batstone and a number of Visiting Fellows who have been selected on the basis of their expertise and practical experience in their given field.  Assessment is in the form of written submissions and presentations through the students’ three years at the College.


In your second year

This area of law is fast moving with frequent legislative change due to pressures for reform from the UK Department of Trade and Industry and from the EU with its policy of harmonising the company law of its member states. The syllabus centres on the way law regulates companies and the facilities company law offers, such as limited liability and transferability of shares, as well as the corresponding burdens (duties of disclosure, compliance with statutory procedures and common law duties) and the dynamics of the often tense relationship between shareholders and management. A vital course for anyone intending to operate in the commercial field; you will benefit from knowledge of Contract, Tort, Trusts and Public law. This course is studied across both Michaelmas and Hilary terms at ‘half pace’.

The European Union (EU) is a relatively new legal system that combines characteristics of international law and national legal systems. EU institutions and law-making powers are examined as well as the key questions of the impact of EU law on national law and its overall consequences for a) business enterprises and b) individuals. As EU law is highly responsive to economic and social changes, legal rules and judicial decisions are studied in their wider context. The subject will appeal to students who enjoyed studying Public law or who have an interest in public affairs, politics, economics or international relations. This course is studied in full in the Michaelmas term.

Much of the work of solicitors turns around land law in the form of conveyancing (buying and selling dwellings or commercial enterprises) or the relations between landlords and tenants. Here the central principles of English law are portrayed, including the necessary historical context, as many of the basic concepts were established in social conditions very different from today. Property law centres on the concept of the nature and quantum of the various interests that can exist in land, the principles governing the creation, transfer and extinction of these interests and the extent that those interests are enforceable against third parties. This course is studied in full in the Hilary term.

The law of tort concerns the civil liability for the wrongful infliction of injury by one person upon another. The characteristic claim in tort is for monetary compensation or damages. There is no single principle of liability, which makes tort law complex; also there are other sources of monetary compensation for personal injuries (such as unemployment/social security payments, private insurance, criminal injuries compensation schemes, etc.) as well as the fact that the same harms may be pursued through the criminal justice system.

Negligence is a key topic and other topics include: interference with economic interest; trespass; defamation; vicarious liability as well as defences and remedies, and sources of future development including EU law. This course is studied across both Michaelmas and Hilary terms at ‘half pace’.

This course develops an intelligent insight into central areas of science and is designed for non-scientists, requiring minimal mathematical skills. Topics include: the beginnings of the universe, fundamental physics and quantum theory, evolutionary biology and social evolution, neurobiology and human psychology. Professor Lawrence M Krauss, Professor Richard Dawkins, Professor Steven Pinker and Professor Daniel C Dennett teach for these courses through a series of participatory lectures.

The teaching is in the first half of the second year. Assessment is by end-of-term exam.

This course provides a general introduction to the history of science and is designed for non-scientists, requiring minimal mathematical skills. Representative topics include: the beginnings of science, the Renaissance and the Scientific Revolution, Galileo and Newton, and science and technology in the 21stcentury.

The teaching is in the second half of the second year. Assessment is by end-of-term exam.

The Advanced Capabilities course runs over students final two years at the College.  The seminars have been designed to provide the capabilities that will be required in a wide variety of roles and also the build the self-reliance and confidence graduates will need to manage their own careers.  Topics covered include entrepreneurship, financial literacy, strategy, the impact of technology, negotiation, and statistics.

By the end of the programme students are able to handle basic financial accounting and business planning. They have also acquired a grasp of the fundamentals that drive most organisations. These capabilities are tested in projects that run at the end of each Trinity term.

The programme is delivered by Matthew Batstone and a number of Visiting Fellows who have been selected on the basis of their expertise and practical experience in their given field.  Assessment is in the form of written submissions and presentations through the students’ three years at the College.


In your third year

A part of Equity law, the law of Trusts deals with the rules and principles governing the creation and operation of trusts – a particular method of holding property that developed historically primarily to preserve family wealth, particularly by minimising liability to taxation. The syllabus focuses on three broad areas: 1) the requirements for establishing a valid trust (including express private trusts; charitable trusts; implied and resulting trusts; constructive trusts); 2) the powers and obligations of trustees under a valid trust (including appointment, retirement and removal of trustees); 3) the remedies available when trustees act improperly. This course is studied across both Michaelmas and Hilary terms at ‘half pace’.

Jurisprudence

This course provides a grounding in the nature of jurisprudence: methodology, analysis, theory and the idea of definition, the relevance of language and ideology. This course is studied in full in the Hilary term.

Intellectual property Law

Intellectual property is a rapidly expanding body of law that has come into increasing domestic and international prominence. Involving both artistic and scientific concerns, intellectual property underpins a wide variety of everyday activities for individual consumers – hence in turn its immense economic and industrial significance. The law of intellectual property rights seeks a difficult balance between rewarding the right owner and the needs of society to gain access to scientific, technological or cultural benefits. It includes copyright, patent and trade-mark law. The course examines the range of different domestic and international legal categories involved in regulating this form of intangible property, and pays specific attention to the ways in which English law, lacking any discrete law of unfair competition, frequently relies on ‘press-ganging’ a range of independent rights (such as confidentiality) to serve that purpose. This course is studied across both Michaelmas and Hilary terms at ‘half pace’.

Dissertation

The third year includes the option to undertake a dissertation, which is supervised but self-directed study on a subject of each student’s choosing.

The Good Life, Human Rights, and Individual Responsibility

This is a series of lectures and debates on major ethical challenges and alternative responses. Lectures are given by members of our Professoriate, such as Peter Singer, and by specialists in different fields. Representative titles are: ‘The good life’, ‘Human rights’, ‘Effective altruism’, and ‘War poetry and witnessing’.

The course is taught in the first half of the third year. Assessment is by end-of-year exam.

Ethics and Public and Professional Life

This is a series of lectures and debates on major ethical challenges and alternative responses. Lectures are given by members of our Professoriate, such as Peter Singer, and by specialists in different fields. Representative titles are: ‘Access to justice’, ‘Civil liberties‘, ‘Corporate Responsibility’, ‘Freedom of the Press’, and ‘Private greed and Public service’.

This course is taught in the second half of the third year. Assessment is by end-of-year exam.

Professional Programme: Advanced Capabilities

The Advanced Capabilities course runs over students final two years at the College.  The seminars have been designed to provide the capabilities that will be required in a wide variety of roles and also the build the self-reliance and confidence graduates will need to manage their own careers.  Topics covered include entrepreneurship, financial literacy, strategy, the impact of technology, negotiation, and statistics.

By the end of the programme students are able to handle basic financial accounting and business planning. They have also acquired a grasp of the fundamentals that drive most organisations. These capabilities are tested in projects that run at the end of each Trinity term.

The programme is delivered by Matthew Batstone and a number of Visiting Fellows who have been selected on the basis of their expertise and practical experience in their given field.  Assessment is in the form of written submissions and presentations through the students’ three years at the College.