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About Dr. Gulzaar Barn

Dr. Gulzaar Barn is a lecturer in philosophy at the New College of the Humanities. Gulzaar convenes and teaches on the Applied Ethics course as part of the NCH Diploma. This involves teaching an overview of applied ethics in Michaelmas Term, and a ‘Technology and Human Values’ module in Hilary term.

 

Qualifications

DPhil in Philosophy, University of Oxford (2018)
MA Legal and Political Theory, University College London (2012)
BA (Hons) Philosophy, University of Manchester (2011)

 

Professional Body Memberships

Member, Society for Applied Philosophy
New Generation Thinker BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), 2018-present

Dr. Gulzaar Barn's Research

Gulzaar’s research explores the ethical dimensions of contemporary practical issues, such as punishment, health, and work. She is also particularly interested in perspectives on the body as property, as well as theories of justice more generally.

 

Selected Publications

Peer-Reviewed Academic Journals

Barn, G. (2016) “Can Medical Interventions Serve as “Criminal Rehabilitation”?” Neuroethics, 2016, 1–12, doi: 10.1007/s12152-016-9264-9. Published open access: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12152-016-9264-9

Barn, G. (2014) “Academic Racism, and the Problems with ‘Race’ as a Scientific Category,” Oxford Left Review, Issue 13, June.

Barn, B., and Barn, G. (2011) “Conceptual Modelling: A Philosophy of Fiction Account,” in Information Systems Development 2011, Springer-Verlag, 2011.

Book Chapters

Barn, G., and Widdows, H., “Feminist Philosophy” in Ethics and the Contemporary World, David Edmonds ed., (Oxford: Routledge, forthcoming 2020).

Barn, G., “Mary Warnock,” in Philosopher Queens (London: Unbound Books, forthcoming 2020). https://unbound.com/books/philosopher-queens/

Policy Briefings, Impact, and Public Engagement

May 2019, BBC Arts and Ideas Podcast, “Stanley Spencer, Domestic Servants, Surrogacy,” https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p07b3p2w

April 2019, The Economist Open Voices, “Don’t Genetically Enhance People – Improve Society Instead,” https://www.economist.com/open-future/2019/04/30/dont-genetically-enhance-people-improve-society-instead

April 2019, The Economist Babbage Podcast, “The Future of Genetic Engineering,” https://www.economist.com/podcasts/2019/04/24/the-future-of-genetic-engineering

March 2019, Talk for broadcast at BBC Free Thinking Festival, “The Essay: Shopping Around the Baby Market,” https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0003t1w

February 2019, National Theatre Programme Article, invited to write a piece for the National Theatre’s production of Tartuffe, on reciprocity and the social contract.

June 2018, Radio Programme for BBC Free Thinking, “Clinical Trials, a form of ‘Labour’?,” https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p069ynrz

March 2018, Talk for broadcast at BBC Free Thinking Festival, “Introducing the New Generation Thinkers 2018,” https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p062lgff

Barn, G, (July 2018) ‘Surrogacy laws: why a global approach is needed to stop exploitation of women,’ https://theconversation.com/surrogacy-laws-why-a-global-approach-is-needed-to-
stop-exploitation-of-women-98966

Barn, G, (June 2016) ‘Sugar and Public Health,’ Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology, https://researchbriefings.parliament.uk/ResearchBriefing/Summary/POST-PN-0530

Dr. Gulzaar Barn's Teaching

At NCH, Gulzaar has developed and taught courses in applied ethics and moral philosophy. These cover topics such as the ethics of punishment, recreational drug use, career choice and social benefit, immigration, torture, civil disobedience, issues raised by artificial intelligence, and the moral limits of markets.

While a lecturer in philosophy at the University of Birmingham, Gulzaar designed and delivered a course on feminist theory for final year undergraduates, an undergraduate introduction to moral philosophy course, and a postgraduate course (on campus and distance learning) on bioethics, which covered topics such as the ethics of genetic selection and ‘enhancement’, experimentation on human subjects, and organ sales. This has involved all aspects of course design, including writing lectures, setting assessments and selecting reading materials, marking essays, as well as giving oral feedback in student meetings.